Posts tagged "africa"
  1. Notes: 228 / 2 years ago  from (originally from sarakstar)
    fyeahafrica:

What is Afrikan Yoga?

 
Afrikan Yoga founded by Pablo M Imani Khonsu Sekhem Ptah is a form of yoga known for it’s use of rhythmic movements, to the sounds of drums which aids in heating up the body in order to performSayunaats/Postures. Adequate natural body heat and energy generation minimises the risks of injury or strain when doing static postures.
There is an emphasis of elemental body awareness and breath.  The development of flexibility, mobility strength, and endurance are emphasized through dance and postures.  Afrikan Yoga is firmly based on the movements of the Neters/Neteru as found on the temple walls at The Temple of Luxor, The Temple of Horus at Edfu and on the scientific methods as mentioned in the Ebers Papyrus Edwin Smith Papyrus Rhind Papyrus the oldest books in the world known as The Pyramid Texts.
 
The Philosophy
Egyptian Philosophy of Maat as expounded by the Egyptian Book of the Dead known as the 42 Precepts or commonly refered to as the ‘Negative confessions’ or ‘Declarations of Innocence and the Ten Virtues of the Initiates’, the wisdom texts include:

via nefferamaat

    fyeahafrica:

    What is Afrikan Yoga?

    Afrikan Yoga founded by Pablo M Imani Khonsu Sekhem Ptah is a form of yoga known for it’s use of rhythmic movements, to the sounds of drums which aids in heating up the body in order to performSayunaats/Postures. Adequate natural body heat and energy generation minimises the risks of injury or strain when doing static postures.

    There is an emphasis of elemental body awareness and breath.  The development of flexibility, mobility strength, and endurance are emphasized through dance and postures.  Afrikan Yoga is firmly based on the movements of the Neters/Neteru as found on the temple walls at The Temple of LuxorThe Temple of Horus at Edfu and on the scientific methods as mentioned in the Ebers Papyrus Edwin Smith Papyrus Rhind Papyrus the oldest books in the world known as The Pyramid Texts.

     

    The Philosophy

    Egyptian Philosophy of Maat as expounded by the Egyptian Book of the Dead known as the 42 Precepts or commonly refered to as the ‘Negative confessions’ or ‘Declarations of Innocence and the Ten Virtues of the Initiates’, the wisdom texts include:

    via nefferamaat

    (Source: sarakstar)

     
  2. Notes: 1021 / 2 years ago  from (originally from afrographique)
    afrographique:

An infographic depicting the percentage share of formal firms that are owned by women in Africa. Data from the World Bank.

    afrographique:

    An infographic depicting the percentage share of formal firms that are owned by women in Africa. Data from the World Bank.

     
  3. Notes: 87 / 2 years ago  from
    fyeahafrica:

[Picture: An 1835 illustration of liberated slaves arriving in Sierra Leone.]
Saros or Creoles in Nigeria during the nineteenth century and early twentieth century were freed slaves who migrated to Nigeria in the beginning of the 1830s.
They were known locally as Saros (elided form of Sierra Leone) or Amaros: migrants from Brazil and Cuba. Saros and Amaros also settled in other West African countries such as the Gold Coast (Ghana). They were mostly freed and repatriated slaves from various West African and Latin American countries such as Sierra Leone, Brazil and Cuba Liberated “returnee” Africans from Brazil were more commonly known as “Agudas”. Most of the Latin American returnees or Amaros started migrating to Africa after slavery was abolished on the continent while others from West Africa, or the Saros were recaptured and freed slaves already resident in Sierra Leone.
Many of the returnees chose to return to Nigeria for cultural, missionary and economic reasons. Many (if not the greater majority) of them were originally descended from the Yoruba people, and so because of this, they were mostly regarded as a part of the ethnic group that the Yoruba constituted in the Nigeria of the era.
The newly arrived immigrants resided in the Niger Delta, Lagos Colony and in some Eastern Nigerian cities such as Aba, Owerri, and Onitsha. Though, many were originally dedicated Anglophiles in Nigeria, they later adopted an indigenous and patriotic attitude on Nigerian affairs due to a rise in discrimination in the 1880s, and were later known as cultural nationalists.
[Read More/Source]

    fyeahafrica:

    [Picture: An 1835 illustration of liberated slaves arriving in Sierra Leone.]

    Saros or Creoles in Nigeria during the nineteenth century and early twentieth century were freed slaves who migrated to Nigeria in the beginning of the 1830s.

    They were known locally as Saros (elided form of Sierra Leone) or Amaros: migrants from Brazil and Cuba. Saros and Amaros also settled in other West African countries such as the Gold Coast (Ghana). They were mostly freed and repatriated slaves from various West African and Latin American countries such as Sierra LeoneBrazil and Cuba Liberated “returnee” Africans from Brazil were more commonly known as “Agudas”. Most of the Latin American returnees or Amaros started migrating to Africa after slavery was abolished on the continent while others from West Africa, or the Saros were recaptured and freed slaves already resident in Sierra Leone.

    Many of the returnees chose to return to Nigeria for culturalmissionary and economic reasons. Many (if not the greater majority) of them were originally descended from the Yoruba people, and so because of this, they were mostly regarded as a part of the ethnic group that the Yoruba constituted in the Nigeria of the era.

    The newly arrived immigrants resided in the Niger DeltaLagos Colony and in some Eastern Nigerian cities such as AbaOwerri, and Onitsha. Though, many were originally dedicated Anglophiles in Nigeria, they later adopted an indigenous and patriotic attitude on Nigerian affairs due to a rise in discrimination in the 1880s, and were later known as cultural nationalists.

    [Read More/Source]

     
  4. Notes: 201 / 2 years ago  from (originally from kilele)
    kilele:

Entry point into the Great Mosque in Touba, Diourbel in Senegal
Photo by Jan Dudas

    kilele:

    Entry point into the Great Mosque in Touba, Diourbel in Senegal

    Photo by Jan Dudas

     
  5. Notes: 97 / 2 years ago  from (originally from lifeisbeautifulnoticeit)
    lifeisbeautifulnoticeit:

Fulani Women by Iris (Irene Becker) on Flickr.
     
  6. Notes: 72 / 3 years ago  from (originally from isyrblackswan)
    isyrblackswan:

Dinka, Legendary Cattle Keepers of Sudan, Angela Fisher & Carol Beckwith

    isyrblackswan:

    Dinka, Legendary Cattle Keepers of Sudan, Angela Fisher & Carol Beckwith

     
  7. Notes: 25 / 3 years ago  from (originally from dailystruggle)
    fyeahafrica:

Nairobi, Kenya
dailystruggle:

the shopping experience - Kimathi Street

    fyeahafrica:

    Nairobi, Kenya

    dailystruggle:

    the shopping experience - Kimathi Street

     
  8. Notes: 114 / 3 years ago  from (originally from kvetchlandia)
    luzfosca:

Three Young Girls, Morocco 1971
by Irving Penn
Thank you kvetchlandia .

    luzfosca:

    Three Young Girls, Morocco 1971

    by Irving Penn

    Thank you kvetchlandia .

     
  9. Notes: 53 / 3 years ago  from (originally from kilele)
    whilst this isn’t egypt, i can’t help but wonder if the ancient egyptians and their wondrous library of alexandria had survived, perhaps their modern day dewelings would look like this (via fyeahafrica)
 kilele:

Lone dog in the midst of modern triangular architecture in Dakar, Senegal
Photo by Lauren Barkume

    whilst this isn’t egypt, i can’t help but wonder if the ancient egyptians and their wondrous library of alexandria had survived, perhaps their modern day dewelings would look like this (via fyeahafrica)

     kilele:

    Lone dog in the midst of modern triangular architecture in Dakar, Senegal

    Photo by Lauren Barkume

     
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fuck yeah? fuck yeah!

 
 

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